Self-Editing For Pet Blog Post Success

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Guest post by Blog Manager Robbi Hess

Picture1Misteaks happen
when your righting blog posts. The point is to self-edit before you hit “publish.”
There are several items you will want to edit – the words themselves (as the
mistakes in the first sentence point to!), your titles and even your intro
paragraphs. These tweaks can help you gain more Google love and even greater
relevance with your readers.

Take the time to
self edit in these particular areas before you publish your pet blog post:

  1. How compelling is your title? Have you used keywords? Do you
    have a title that is relevant to your blog post content? Consider this title: “How
    To Wash a Cat” sure, it tells you what the article is about but not much more
    than that, now consider this: “Five Ways to Wash a Cat And Not Get Scratched.” Specificity
    matters.
  2. Hook the reader with your first sentence… with your first words.
    Fiction writers understand the need to hook the editor and eventually the
    reader with a well-honed first sentence. Bloggers need to hone that skill.
  3. Be a go-to expert for your readers. What resources can you
    include? What pet blogging experts can you tap into to enhance your blog post information?
    What information can you share with your readers that has been posted by
    experts in the field?
  4. Know your audience. I’ve written about knowing your audience
    before, but it bears repeating. Your readers are accustomed to your particular style, your writing voice/persona – humorous, straightforward, first person or third person point of view,
    question style, etc. If your readers are responding to your style, stick with
    it. If you find that you get more comments or shares of your blog posts when
    you write a how to or a personal essay, you may want to lean more toward that
    style of prose.
  5. Online readers are different than offline readers. If a reader
    picks up a magazine, he or she may be planning to settle in for a leisurely
    read. A blog reader is likely looking for a “quick fix” of information. When
    you consider that many readers may be checking your blog post from their smart
    phone, brevity and short, easy to read paragraphs are key to keeping their interest.
    Numbered lists, bullet points and subheads lead to readability.

How diligent are
you in your self-editing? 

 

  • http://www.somethingwagging.com Pamela | Something Wagging This Way Comes

    I find the “After the Deadline” WordPress plugin a helpful editing tool. It makes some bad suggestions. But because it stops and gives me one more chance to edit before a post publishes, I’ve caught things I otherwise miss.
    Now if only I could get it for my blog comments. 🙂

  • http://www.mydivasdish.com Robbi

    Tools like Microsoft editing aren’t always 100% helpful — lol especially in my first sentence! but like you say, they highlight info and “make” you go back and re-read.

  • http://profile.typepad.com/d105628214832830221 Glogirly and Katie

    I always read my posts out loud a few times. Since I write everything in the voice of my sarcastic kitty, it helps me to “hear” whether I’ve got the voice right. And I really think she enjoys me reading it to her. ; )
    ~Glogirly

  • http://ask-fisher.com Fisher

    I take a lot of time editing my blogs, but get in a too much of a hurry when I am commenting. I am trying to take more time with my comments!

  • http://www.fidoseofreality.com Carol Bryant

    Very good points, Robbi!

  • http://opcatchat.blogspot.com caren gittleman

    applause!! I particularly LOVED this “Online readers are different than offline readers. If a reader picks up a magazine, he or she may be planning to settle in for a leisurely read. A blog reader is likely looking for a “quick fix” of information. When you consider that many readers may be checking your blog post from their smart phone, brevity and short, easy to read paragraphs are key to keeping their interest. Numbered lists, bullet points and subheads lead to readability.”
    I always say that online readers are looking for a “quick fix”….not a book or a magazine

  • http://profile.typepad.com/wagthedoguk Wagthedoguk

    It is so true about online reading vs. offline reading. I know, because I do it myself.
    I try to edit my post now on the next day. I write the post one day and then come back to it the next day and read it like it was my first time reading it.
    I seem to find more things that need tending this way.

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  • Doug Bell

    It’s no secret that the publishing and film industries are getting tougher, with more submissions competing for fewer spots. By this your content will be viral and the bar has been raised, and first-time writers whose work would have been accepted a few short years ago might now be turned away at the door.